When Do I Split Peonies in Minnesota?

23.jpg

Many peonies are hardy to United States Department of Agriculture Plant Hardiness Zone 2, making them a reliable garden plant in Minnesota where winter freezes can begin as early as Sept. 1. Spring comes late. Minnesota’s last hard freeze occurs from May 1 to June 1. Considerations Peonies bloom in early spring. They often begin…


How to Split and Transplant Daylilies

zzz.jpg

If a section of your garden is being overrun by daylilies, this is the article for you. It is easy to separate and transplant overgrown daylilies to another part of your garden. Difficulty: Moderately Easy Instructions Things You’ll Need Daylilies Garden sheers Spade The first thing that you have to do is to dig up…


How to Split a Clematis

4.jpg

The clematis, a perennial vine from the buttercup family, thrives in USDA Hardiness zones 3 and higher. Ohio State University notes that the woody deciduous clematis is regaining popularity as an attractive yet rugged vining plant for growing in the home garden. Propagate the woody vine by taking softwood cuttings in late spring from new,…


How Do I Split Bleeding Hearts?

dosplitbleedinghearts_800x800.jpg

Bleeding Heart (Dicentra spectabilis) is an old-fashioned, hardy perennial plant that blooms with white or fuchsia flowers that seem to drip from arching stems in May and June. Some people describe the flowers as looking like breeches. Bleeding hearts like well-drained soil and grow well in partially shady areas. They can grow to two to…


How to Split a Giant White Bird of Paradise Plant

images7.jpg

The giant white bird of paradise plant, also known as strelitzia nicolai, is an ornamental flowering plant native to South Africa. Because of how slowly bird of paradise seeds germinate, giant white bird of paradise plant are best propagated by division. Splitting a bird of paradise plant into several individual plants is much less difficult…


How to Split Azalea Bushes

images4.jpg

More than 10,000 different azalea plants have been registered, according to the Azalea Society of North America. Generally easy to care for, the flowering plant is available is a wide selection of colors, including white and various shades of red. Yellow is the only color not available for native North America plants. Azaleas are propagated…


Page 1 of 11