How to Divide Peonies in the Winter

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Peonies are perennials that bloom year after year from the same root system. A clump of peonies features large, colorful blooms and may last for up to 100 years. This lifespan means that peony plants become extremely large and may overwhelm a given planting site. Gardeners avoid overcrowding by digging up peony roots during their…


How to Dig Up and Divide a Peony

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Peonies are long-lived perennials that bloom in every color except blue and add brilliant life to the landscape for decades. Classified by flower forms — single, semi-double, double, Japanese and anemone — peonies produce show-stopping flowers in the spring, and continue to provide visual interest with dark green, glossy foliage until autumn arrives. While most…


How to Divide Daylilies

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Daylilies are the backbone of the perennial garden flowerbed. They are tough, low-maintenance, adaptable plants that thrive almost everywhere. These flowers bloom best in full sun and when they are divided to encourage growth. Also, dividing them is a great way to build your garden with minimum cost. Here’s how to get more blooms for…


How To Divide Daylilies & Irises

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Daylilies and irises flower freely when they are first planted. But after a few years the plants can become dense and crowded. Eventually, the the plant suffers and loses energy. Less energy means fewer flowers. Dividing the plants is good for the plant and the gardener. Irises and daylilies will thrive and you will have…


How to Divide Stella de Oro Daylilies

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Few perennials are as rewarding to grow as Stella de Oro daylilies. These trouble-free plants with their prolific, golden-yellow flowers are one of the most popular daylilies of all time, according to the University of Vermont. Grow them in full sun or light shade. Their small size, 12 to 16 inches tall by 24 inches…


How to Plant & Divide Irises

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Irises are perennial plants that grow from rhizomes. These structures are thick underground stems from which roots sprout downward and plant stalks shoot upward, breaking through the ground. In the case of irises, rhizomes resemble sweet potatoes. As the plant gets older, its rhizomes multiply underground. Too many of them in one hole cause the…


How to Divide Shasta Daisy Plants

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Shasta daisies are an old-fashioned favorite in the garden. Both novice and experienced gardeners will easily grow a beautiful clump of shasta daisies in a sunny growing area that will return year after year to provide lovely summer blooms. As the years go by, shasta daisies will expand and many gardeners like to divide them…


How to Divide a Purple Coneflower

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Purple coneflower (Echinacea purpurea) is an old-fashioned perennial bloomer with bright daisy-like blooms with distinctive, dark purple centers. Drought- and heat-tolerant, purple coneflower isn’t fussy, and once established, will decorate your garden from early summer until autumn for many years. Purple coneflower benefits from division when the center of the plant outgrows its boundaries, or…


How to Divide a Bleeding Heart Bush

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Bleeding Heart is a great plant to have in your garden; it does well in sun or in shade, is tolerant to drought and thrives with damp feet. Although its blossoming time is short, the foliage stays green all summer long, providing texture and color to the background of your summer and fall flowers. Dividing…


How to Divide a Bird of Paradise Plant

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The bird of paradise is a showy bloomer that thrives in tropical climates. Propagation from seed is difficult, but fortunately full grown plants can be divided to produce two separate plants. Separation is not harmful to the plant as the roots are not easily damaged. Careful handling allows the gardener to have two flowering beauties…


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