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Planting Calla Lillies


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Calla lilies are beautiful, colorful flowers that are considered quite easy to grow with the proper know-how. The flowers grow from a bulb, but they are not really lilies. Callas belong to the zantedeschia genus. In addition to their use in gardens and landscaped beds, calla lilies are a popular wedding flower and are frequently used in funeral arrangements as well. They are available in an array of colors, including white, yellow, orange and pink.

 

Planting

Calla lilies grow from a type of bulb called a rhizome, and they can be grown outdoors in gardens and beds, in containers or indoors as long as they are placed in a sunny location. They thrive in humid locations as opposed to dry, dessert climates. Callas will do best in loose, well-drained soil. They can be planted in the spring, but be sure the threat of frost has passed before planting. Calla lilies will do best in a location with full sun or partial shade. The rhizomes must be planted quite deep, about 4 inches for optimal results. Plant the flowers about 1 foot apart. Immediately after planting, thoroughly water the bulbs.

Care

Calla lilies do not require a lot of upkeep, but some regular care and maintenance is necessary to produce beautiful flowers. They will do best if they are kept moist throughout the growing season, so make sure to water them during dry spells. Apply fertilizer to the plants about once a month. To help keep the plant moist and prevent weeds from growing around it, put some mulch around it. Once your callas have flowered, they will go through a dormant period. During this time, stop watering the plants so they can die back.

Winter Care

For winter, the calla lily rhizomes should be dug up and stored in a cool, dry place. After the first frost, dig up the bulbs and take care to remove excess dirt. Let them air out in a dry place such as a garage for a few days. Once the bulbs are dry, pack them in peat moss and store them in a cool, dry location until they can be replanted in spring, after the threat of frost has passed.

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