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How To Take Proper Care Of your Indoor Bonsai Tree (part 1)


images (3) With proper care, your bonsai will remain healthy, beautiful and miniature for many years to come. Since your bonsai is a living miniature tree, it will increase in beauty as it matures through the years. The instructions below are just the basics and, therefore, I recommend that you purchase one of the many fine books available on the subject.
PLACEMENT SUMMER
When nightly lows do not dip below 40 degrees, your bonsai should be placed outside, such as on a patio, balcony, terrace or in a garden. Once outside, your bonsai should be positioned where it will receive sufficient sun — morning sun and afternoon shade is best. A bonsai can be viewed best when it is placed approximately three to four feet high (eye level), such as on a table, wall or bench.

PLACEMENT WINTER
Once nightly lows begin approaching the 40 degree mark, it is time to bring your indoor bonsai inside. This should be done gradually over a period of several weeks. Bring it in for a few hours the first time, slowly increasing the time it spends indoors until it becomes acclimated to its new environment. The ideal indoor location is on a window sill facing south. An east or west exposure is second best. A northern exposure will work, but will necessitate the use of "grow lights" to provide sufficient light to keep your bonsai healthy. Four to six hours of sunlight per day should suffice. If you can provide more, so much the better.

WATERING
The watering of your bonsai must never be neglected. Apply water when the soil appears dry — never allow the soil to become completely dry. If your bonsai is receiving full sun, it may be necessary to water once a day. This schedule may vary with the size pot, type of soil and type of bonsai tree you own. Evaluate each tree’s water requirements and adjust your watering schedule to accommodate it. It is a good idea to use a moisture meter
until you get to know the requirements of your bonsai tree. Watering should be done with a watering can or hose attachment which should dispense the water in a soft
enough manner as not to disturb the soil. Water should be applied until it begins running out of the holes in the
bottom of your pot. A good rain is usually a sufficient watering

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